20 Home Recording Studio Photos From Audio Tech Junkies

I consider myself lucky to live in a time period when recording technology is developing so rapidly. When I was a child, I never thought it would be possible to produce professional sounding music at home. With the increase in affordable home studio equipment came a new breed of tech junkies. Sometimes, I like to look at photos of other home recording studios to get ideas. Here are some I thought were worth sharing.

1

Home recording studio with lots of piano keyboardsCredit

 

2

Home recording studio with multiple monitors
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3

Home Recording Studio with Drums and Guitars
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4

Home recording studio in small room
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5

Cozy Looking Home Recording Studio
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6

Alexanders home recording studio with lots of instruments
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7

Old school home recording studio
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8


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9

Home recording studio with instruments and equipment only
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10

Home recording studio with rug on floor
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11

Home Recording Studio with Faders
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12

Home Recording Studio With Large Console and Angled Ceiling
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13

Home Recording Studio in White Room
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14

Home recording studio with a fireplace
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15

Control room in a home recording studio
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16

Home recording studio with a wooden ceiling
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17

Home recording studio with isolation room
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18


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19

Small home recording studio with Rokit monitorsCredit

 

20

Home recording studio with three guitars
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Recommended Gear

Presonus Audiobox Studio Recording Bundle
Yamaha Hs80m 8″ Powered Studio Monitor
Studio Rta Producer Station
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  • http://www.kartinigrup.com cangkirkopi

    nice .,. :D

    • Dave Little

      I love looking at these setups……really neat

  • http://audiovfx.info audi

    it’s cool,
    I also want to build a mini studio in my bedroom hehehe :D

    • Todd Millett

      Haha you should do it!

  • http://www.bahamasentertainers.com Christian Justilien

    Want to setup a studio, had one about 15 years ago here in the Bahamas using Logic, Mac pro, etc… where do I begin? soooo much nice gear out there. Do I need a mixer or mixing on computer sufficient?

    • Todd Millett

      Hey Christian. It depends on your budget, but I recommend to begin with a computer capable running audio software, your choice of DAW software (I like Cubase), at least 1 good multi-purpose microphone (SM-57 is popular), a good recording interface (I like the Presonus Firestudio), some studio reference monitors (for this you should go to a music store that lets you listen to them on display such as Guitar Center, and pick the one that sounds best to YOU while listening to music you are very familiar with. You can bring what you want to listen to and ask the staff if you need assistance), and of course some decent cables and microphone stands. You also may want to look into some DIY room acoustic treatment. Hope this helps!

  • http://homerecstudio.blog.com MarkT

    Hey, thanks for the pics. I love the booth created directly in the living room. That inspired me to extend my home recording studio…

    • Todd Millett

      No problem! I really liked that one too. Glad it inspired you! That’s the name of the game!

  • Ghee

    Hi. I am writing my own music but would like to record them by setting up my own home studio. Do have a PC, the software and good sound. Don’t have a mixer though. I also have the problem with cars driving past on the Prince George Drive making some noice whole day. How can I illiminate that? What other equipment/tools do I need to start recording?

    • Todd Millett

      Hey Ghee,

      Sounds like the essentials you would need are a digital recording interface, microphone(s), and microphone cable(s) just to get you started with recording. Then, I would seriously consider getting a decent set of studio monitor speakers so you can have an accurate reference when mixing your songs to make them sound nice and spiffy!

      Not sure how loud the cars are driving by, so it’s hard for me to judge, but one of the simplest effective solutions without going all out and soundproofing your room would be to have a close range dynamic mic like the SM-57. Get it as close to the sound source as possible and make sure the sound source is loud so you don’t have to make the recording signal as hot (Although you still want the results to be somewhat close to clipping without actually clipping. This will help cancel out anything that isn’t right up against the microphone. The reason I said SM-57 is because it is well renowned and very versatile. Some applications include guitars, drums (commonly snare drum), decent for bass, pianos, and even vocals (I find it even gives a warmer vocal sound than the “industry standard” SM-58. Just make sure to use a pop filter, and you may still need to put the mic just under the mouth so it doesn’t project directly into it.)

      Not sure what your budget is, but if you only need to record 1 or 2 tracks at once and want to get a lot of bang for the buck on a recording interface, look into the Presonus Firebox. As far as the mic cable goes, you pretty much get what you pay for. Higher end cables will help to block out interference and achieve a cleaner signal. However, you can get cables really cheap and always upgrade later. A $10 cable may suite your needs just fine for now.

      Hope this helps! Let me know if there is anything else I can help with.

      • NEXZY

        WHICH SPEAKER IS THE BEST 1 COULD USE TO START AN HOME STUDIO

        • http://toddmillett.com/ Todd Millett

          Hi Nexzy,

          It depends on your price range and your personal preferences for what sounds most appealing to your ears. If there is a Guitar Center near you or some place where you can listen to monitor speakers on demo, this is the best way to do it. Bring a track you know really well and put it on and then compare all of the speakers. Choose the ones within your budget that are most true to the way the track sounds (of course, you may want to check reviews on it first as well just to be sure its good quality). With that said, I love the Yamaha HS 80M / HS 50M’s for its price range, and for something in a lower price range the M-Audio BX5’s are pretty awesome! But seriously, go give some monitors a listen for yourself if you have a chance first. Hope this helps!

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  • http://poorstudio.com/ Poor Studio

    I love all the different studios that you show here. I like to see other people’s personal work space every once in a while.  It is true you do not need to spend all kinds of money right away getting all the studio equipment. Its better to start with what you need to start producing, and more importantly, get your media exposed!

  • joseph

    nice ….

  • DjMatu Yerlinson

    exelente!!

  • Harry

    I’m sorry, but are they 6×9 car speakers in number 7? I can’t even begin to explain the level of wrong in that speaker setup.

    • Tomos Walter

      You don’t know what the rest of the set up looks like. That could be a test area – try your mix on as many systems as possible, including car speakers.

      Also, I think that’s quite an enterprising way of getting cheap sound. 6x9s possibly donated, it looks like DJ practice, not doing a movie-grade 7.1 audio mix.

  • Pablitoz68

    Picture #10. Nice equipment til you get to the 90’s era Compaq desktop. Yikes!